Why I Stopped Caring About My Blogging Stats


One week or two of being on Twitter as a blogger brought me a lot of interesting information that I was not aware of. One fact that I can testify for is that the blogging community on Twitter is much friendlier and more human than the academic community. When I was using Twitter as an academic, there was not one single post that I did not have to review countless times before letting it go up. If you use Twitter as an academic, any grammar error or typo will be used against you. Any unpopular idea or thought will also be used against you. The subjective bullying among people is insane and the pressure you feel to be always the smartest in the thread is excruciating. So I really said ‘no, thank you’ to Twitter but recently I felt I should give it a second try – this time as a blogger (my Twitter handle is @theWblogger by the way!).

There are more pros than cons about using Twitter as a blogger. The community is really supportive and you can easily find other bloggers who vibe on the same frequency as you do. Of course, some people will stick around, others will never visit your blog again, but you do get a different flavour of who is out there. Not everyone will love your writing and not everyone will feel happy if your content is somewhat ‘popular’ in the niche or topic they also write about. That’s definitely a con, but you find people like these anywhere, so it’s not a ‘Twitter thing’. What’s more blunt among the blogging community on Twitter though is the never ending quest for blog stats and monetisation. Not a single day goes by without someone showing up on my Twitter feed talking about their goals in terms of daily, weekly, and even monthly views. I find that annoying and digitally draining (I did mute a couple of people because of that), but the truth is that I also started paying more attention to my blogging stats since I came back to Twitter as a blogger.

As a blogger, Twitter has been really helpful in the sense that it has allowed me to interact more with people who have the same interests as me. I’m also happy we increased our views by 200% between January and March of this year. What I’m not particularly happy about is the pressure that people feel to increase their views and other blogging stats, which then also start bogging us down. I have seen people literally obsessed over it, to the point of becoming depressed when they don’t reach the level of attention they got last week. It’s sad to observe it and it’s annoying too. I don’t want their stress to become my stress, because this blog is a place to unwind and connect. I get the importance of having blogging goals, but if you only care and talk about your blogging stats, you stop being present for yourself and for your readers. You become a typing machine and an internet peasant. So the question I made to myself this weekend was Do I want to be perceived as a needy, desperate person? Is that aligned with the message I want to convey to the world through this platform?

It would be great to sustain myself through blogging to the speed of light, but at what expense? Over this past weekend I did some research on the different methods around blog monetisation and all I can tell you is that my stomach felt pretty sick. You have a few smart-asses making money from the despair of people who like me are passionate about blogging and who dream of living from the impact of their writing. My biggest inspiration on this matter is Rachel Hollis, but she didn’t become a full-time blogger by sacrificing her blog’s soul and displaying ads that have nothing to do with the message she wanted to share with the world. She started working with companies that were relevant to her and that’s what I want to do because that’s what I really like doing! I want to bring and debate reality with people who resonate with what I write (and learn from those who don’t whenever possible!).

So I don’t really want to stress over stats and I don’t want to buy into that culture. I really do love blogging but I love my ethics more. I’m not here to promote products or anything else for the sake of money. If you read my post about feedback, you know that at this stage in life I’m pretty much unemployed and searching for happiness after getting and living burned out for more than three years. I can’t embark, however, on a journey of money making through blogging. Yes, it seems we are growing and it is my dream to reach people through writing. It is my dream to empower people who struggle with similar or even the same problems I do. I don’t want that to come true though at the expense of my values and vision.

Hence, my standard here is to only work with people and companies whose message resonates with what I believe in. And what I believe in is ethical businesses, sustainability, and global wellbeing. That’s the kind of brand I want to be and that’s what we are going for here at The Wellbeing Blogger. If it wasn’t, I wouldn’t make this post go up. The next step is to remove the Amazon affiliate links from the books I recommended here on the blog (we have a new section called ‘Wellbeing Library‘ by the way, check it out!), because even that is making me itchy. So bare with me while I take care of those small details and check out what I have rejected to promote so far:

  • a brand of dildos (yes, it’s laughable, I know) and other sex toys (not that sex is not important for wellbeing, but it doesn’t really resonate with the blog’s current vision and mission);
  • an affiliate program about Search Engine Optimisation (SEO);
  • cannabis-based products for health and wellbeing.
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35 thoughts on “Why I Stopped Caring About My Blogging Stats

  1. Well put. I never expected to make any money blogging, but I hoped to at least have a reader or two… I often take a break from blogging and then I decide that maybe someone, someday, will find my stuff and make use of it. But I’m certainly not going to stress over the numbers. (Or work too hard to generate more…lazy me.) Writing is therapy!

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Im with Grandma, I never expected to make any money from blogging either. For me blogging is a great medium to share diary eqs entries of our thoughts and lives, and it’s interesting to read about other people’s lives taxi cab driver from Mumbai, stay-at-home housewife from England super interesting.
      Then again I bet you could brand those Dildos as Tools for a Holitic Massage to Ease the stress from body and mind after a long day of work. 🀭

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Joseph, I think that’s a viable way to go around it but still, I don’t think I’m prepared to be a dildo ambassador at this moment in time 🀣 I will probably rethink it if my favourite Saturday night plan is to stay home alone with a cat and reading/writing on WordPress, haha. I also love to read those stories, it’s always amusing to leave my own head and drift away into questions around tupperwares and how to ditch mold from walls. Oh, all those nice recipes… 🀀🀀🀀

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    2. Well, now you have one more reader here πŸ˜‰ I think I followed the same path, writing for me is firstly therapy, but today is quite exciting to read other people’s perspectives and learn from them too. Over the past five years, maybe, my curiosity was gauged though by the laptop lifestyle that started to boom on the internet – now that I looked into it a bit further… ah… it’s better to keep everything as it is!! πŸ˜„

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  2. This is very true. We all want our blogs to do well and most of us what it to lead to a career in writing or blogging however we shouldn’t get depressed about our numbers.
    Thank you for sharing with us.
    Alyssa
    THESACREDSPACEAP.COM

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Totally agree with you, people can become sucked into the world of stats, views and followers rather than enjoying the process of sharing what they have written. We all put posts out there to be read, some do better than others, but it certainly doesn’t put me off continuing. I write for me and if others enjoy it then it is a great big bonus. I love that blogging can put you in touch with people throughout the world and it opens up your mind to everything….My problem is I just need more time to write and read more blogs.
    All very great and i’ll take a peak at your library. Thank you xx

    Liked by 4 people

    1. True, I agree with you – even though writing here may be some sort of therapy or a way of self-expression, deep inside we always secretly (or not so secretly) wish others to read. I like to think I have the same mindset, I first write whatever I feel like, then if it resonates with people or even helps the better. It’s really a bonus when people with similar mindset come around. Some stay for a short time, others for a longer period of time… but it seems to be so in real life too. Hope you continue blogging indeed, because your blog is one of those I really enjoy to read on a Friday / Saturday night πŸ˜„ xx

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I agree that the Twitter community has been way more supportive than any other platform I’ve used. I actually read 3 posts yesterday by the same person who was excited that their “likes” were going up fast. Didos? hahaha!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Haha, it’s so crazy. I mute those because even though I tell myself ‘just ignore it’, I can’t 🀣 Other than that Twitter for blogging is really amazing. Not even Instagram works so well! Dildos would probably sky rock on Instagram πŸ€·β€β™€οΈπŸ˜…

      Liked by 1 person

  5. As a new blogger, I definitely feel that initial surge of joy whenever I see a *like* or follow but reading this gave me a new look into blogging.

    Your dream is doable! As long as you put yourself out there to achieve it. I’m glad you didn’t compromise your principles to do it. hahaha Dildo ads would not fit the aesthetic of this blog. Nope.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. We all do get that feeling 😁 The first one saying that doesn’t is probably lying πŸ˜‚ I just think we shouldn’t get too carried away and being every 5 minutes asking for followers or commenting on how many views they are from achieving X is very… uh… obsessing. It’s about moderation and good sense – on Twitter is just easier to observe this and it’s a bit scary. Scarier than promoting dildos! Haha. Thanks for coming by lovely, I will check your new blog soon!

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  6. I’m kind of in this stage now, and I really do focus on my stats a lot. I know I shouldn’t get wrapped up in the numbers, but I’m always thinking β€œWhat am I doing and how can I be doing better.” I blog because I love blogging, but I do also want to see growth on a continuous basis without becoming a slave to the numbers and everything.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I think as long you don’t consume yourself with it, it’s fairly normal. As you say, as long as we don’t become slaves and start posting every 5 minutes ‘I’m X views from my Z goal’, haha. Numbers are a good reference and can also be a feedback tool for improvement – I do celebrate milestones from time to time here on the blog πŸ™ŒπŸΌ

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I’ve not yet tried tweeting… I keep humming and haahing about whether to give it a go. You have given me more food for thought. It seems there are benefits, but thanks for warning about the downside.
    I love your blog and the whole ethos around it. Everything fits πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Haha, for me Twitter is where bullying is more noticeable but it’s really a matter of niche. Overall, it’s nice for bloggers, but I have to say that I personally prefer to bump into new bloggers through the WordPress reader. It’s friendlier, more ‘personal’ and it seems easier to find people who we resonate more with 😊

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  8. This is awesome! I love reading your posts! I’ve been struggling with what I want to do with my blog lately and stats and views seems to be eveyone’s goals. I got sucked into it and was pushing myself past my limits. I love your idea of just working with brands you believe in and loving blogging. If I ever get the work with brands this is my goal. Not views, not clicks, or ads, or affiliate marketing! thanks so much for sharing this πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You’re so sweet, thank you! I like your blog posts too because authenticity comes through your writing, it’s not forced 😊 Listen to what your heart tells you about the direction of your blog and go for it. It may be more time consuming but I think that approach and mindset are worthwhile. Your blog is very unique and specific, I believe there is a lot to explore with brands and organizations you identify with πŸ˜‰

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  9. I agree that getting obsessed and depressed about our stats is beyond ridiculous. Is it exciting to see the numbers going up? Yes, absolutely. But when they go down (and they always do at some point), we shouldn’t get upset or depressed about it. That’s ridiculous.

    I started blogging because I love to write and help bring my experiences and knowledge to others in hopes that it may make somebody else’s life just a bit easier than it was before. It’s that simple. Am I going to make a lot of money with my blog? Nope, I really don’t think so. But I will admit, I still am trying to make some money out of it.

    Do I use affiliate links? Yes, but only for products, I back up and can attest to their value. I don’t throw products in only to make a buck or two. I figured, if I’m going to be posting links for recommended products that have made my life easier as it is already, then why not make it an affiliate link? It doesn’t make the item cost any more for the person buying it, so it’s not hurting anybody. Am I going to go crazy posting affiliate links on my twitter feed and everywhere else? Absolutely not. I reserve my links for my blog posts. I hate seeing affiliate links being shared on social media. That looks desperate to me.

    The blogging community on Twitter truly is one of the most supportive and positive communities I’ve seen.

    Thank you very much for this post!! I love and value your opinions and thoughts very much.

    Keep up the amazing work!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I giggled so much reading your comment because of the word ‘ridiculous’. I believe that’s the right fitting word and I didn’t have the balls to say it on the post, so thank you! Haha. I also think that’s the most beautiful way to describe blogging and I totally relate to it. Your comment is very empowering and honest and I’m sure people don’t feel ‘weird’ about any of your affiliate links. I think it’s only very weird when people try to sell something and you can notice that it is very forced from their part. It stresses me to feel their stress for having to sell. Now that I think of it, it’s like an outbound call-center… Anyway, we’re here for the love of writing and people, that’s uplifting 😊 Thank you for your awesome input and motivation, I really appreciate it! πŸ₯°

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  10. That would be fun though (and very ironic) – Wellbeing blogger stressing out over the stats, haha.
    I imagine, that the smartest guys now make money on blogs with tips like “how to make money of your blog” bc this is what every blogger thinks of, at one point or another.
    Hmm, dildo offer was the cherry on the cake of that post! :))

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Haha, everything around here is usually very ironic – the psychologist against mental health labels, the wellbeing coach who deals with an eating disorder, the mindfulness researcher who loses her temper, but stressing over stats or promoting dildos are two things I definitely don’t want to get involved with πŸ˜„ And you’re absolutely right, even on Instagram I get random ads from people selling exactly that. It’s so smart now that campaigns already make it relevant to your location – ‘how to become an influencer in Portugal’ πŸ€¦β€β™€οΈπŸ˜„

    Like

  12. I love this post! I have been putting SO much pressure on myself to eventually monetize my blog, but just this week, I asked myself if it’s worth it. I work my ass off and have very little traffic, plus the fact that my blog really is just that, MY blog. I can do what I want, and I guess I just felt like I should be working toward making money because that’s what people with blogs do. I feel a lot of relief with my decision to not worry about it, so I know it’s the right thing to do! Thanks for posting this, it really resonated with me. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey Jennifer, thanks a lot for your feedback – it’s so overwhelming to be under the pressure of what is out there about blogging. It’s fantastic if we can make money doing what we love (blogging in this case), but once we get too focused on the money side we stop loving to blog so much and readers can also feel that. I hope you can make it your way! I found this video by Gillian Perkins some time ago and it helped me a lot with making up my mind about the money aspect. Hope it can help you too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ztjNjuL5HM

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I genuinely believe that your goals and intentions are important in what you do, and this is reflected out into the world, whether intentionally or not. Well done for staying true and genuine. But I’m still giggling about the dildos…

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Great post, Vanessa! As an academic in the music world, the very first paragraph resonated with me deeply. Same thing. I choose every word with academic twitter handle very carefully because I know every word will be scrutinized, and if there is any hole in my tweet, someone will inevitably find it and mention it to elevate themselves. It’s exhausting. This post caught my eye today while perusing your site because, as it turns out, I wrote a piece this week on the negatives of focusing on blog traffic. I am very new to blogging, but I also have noticed how easy it is to lose contact with the initial impetus for a blog’s creation under the avalanche of tweets and posts about increasing blog traffic. Thank you for sharing this post. It’s excellent and offers a fresh perspective!

    Roger

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Roger. It’s very nice to read your thoughts and experience on it. I used to hate Twitter because of that – now there’s support and comfort from other bloggers. We just need to be careful to not let ourselves get bugged by the ‘traffic seekers’. The option to ‘mute’ people without necessarily unfollowing them has done great wonders, I rarely see posts about traffic these days. Many people do it without realizing it, but we don’t need to expose ourselves to unnecessary triggers. Your post on this topic is really good!

      Liked by 1 person

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