A Night At Gatwick’s Airport

When I realised there were no buses or trains to Canterbury by the time I would arrive to Gatwick, I felt very pleased with my decision of returning to Lisbon. No, I’m not in Lisbon right now, I just arrived to Gatwick’s airport where I will spend the night until the next available train to the end of the world. Lucky me I get to experience one of those British movie scenes in which someone leaves an unattended bag in a seat and there are at least five people from security looking at the bag and whispering “don’t touch it”. Exciting times.

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Sensitivity, Extreme Empathy and Psi Phenomena

It was 2am when a Facebook Messenger notification showed up on my laptop screen. It was M., one of the very first people from whom I learned about Spirituality. Back then I didn’t know I would go from an atheist to someone who has her own connection with God, Source, Cosmic Energy, whatever you really prefer to call it. I didn’t know I would find out that the way I perceive reality is indeed peculiar. I didn’t know I would find a niche (three, actually) within Psychology that describes many of those peculiar experiences and I also didn’t know I would find so many references in Buddhism, Hinduism, and even Alchemy that back up the existence of a very subtle energy field which connects us all. Since a very young age, I have always had this thought: there is nothing new to be found, everything is already explained in very, very old texts. The more I grow and the more I explore, the more I confirm that thought. The fun and exciting part of wandering around libraries and hanging out with old, dusty books is exactly this: finding valuable information about our human experience that no one or very few people teach in the so called “Western World”. Those old, dusty books have reassured me that there is nothing wrong or abnormal with the way I (and many of you, I believe) perceive or feel.

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I Can Breathe Again, Away From The Queen’s Land

I only noticed how poorly I was breathing until I landed yesterday night in Lisbon. How did things become so heavy? At what point did I stop being positive and turned into a grumpy, annoying, all-the-time stressed, little gnome? When, exactly, did I stop being ‘me’ to become a human black hole?

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How I Have Managed Fibromyalgia Symptoms

In this post I’m going to share with how I have managed fibromyalgia symptoms through developing my intuition, working on myself, and by reducing stress in my life. If you want a further explanation about my professional opinion regarding Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue, and other similar syndromes, please make sure you watch the YouTube video below.

 

 

Two years ago, I bumped into a possible diagnosis of Fibromyalgia. I was beginning the second year of my PhD, I had a deficient support network, I felt isolated, and totally uninspired by the research work I was doing the environment  I was working in. At that time, however, I didn’t make a link between what was happening in my life and the way I was feeling, both physically and psychologically.

Little is yet known about Fibromyalgia, its origins and right treatment. Some professionals still believe it is something “made up” in the patient’s head and therefore not real – but trust me, it is very R-E-A-L. You feel tired all the time or you get tired from doing almost nothing; your energy level is consistently low; you may experience brain fog; and last, but not least, you do experience overgeneralised physical pain.

I see Fibromyalgia as an aggravated diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue and in which physical pain and lack of energy become very limiting. The pain does not stem from bruises or any sort of physical trauma, and the lack of energy is not a matter of rest. Medical exams will usually show that everything is normal and there is no reason for the patient to complain – but trust me, we do have a lot to complain about.

It took me a long while to understand the root cause of my Fibromyalgia symptoms. Even though I’ve been all about the mind-body connection for the last couple of years, I was not aware of how my past blockages and current unhappiness were fuelling my “invisible” pain. Two things helped me realising that:

  • I started to notice that when I was happy, had something to be happy about, or I was simply taking good care of myself (i.e. eating good food, exercising, doing things I love),  I had no pain and I would have enough energy; and
  • I read a couple of blogs written by fibromyalgia patients and through their posts I realised that the majority of them (myself included!!!) were being negative about life and themselves, would have no hope for the future, and also present signs of depression

From this point on, I started to pay more attention to the link between what was happening in my life, what my lifestyle looked like, and how was I feeling, both physically and psychologically. As soon as I became more aware of these aspects, I developed a greater sense of intuition which led me to also identify what I needed to change in order to have more energy and experience greater flow in life. Below are five of the things I did to manage my symptoms, and which I strongly recommend to anyone who is considering a potential fibromyalgia diagnosis or has been already diagnosed by a sensitive professional.

Go Within

I know this is cliche but it is the only way to find out what will work best for you. One of the biggest sources of help was the identification of my mental and emotional blockages. More often than not we go through life in “automatic pilot” and we are not even aware of what we really feel and how different life’s situations affect us. Moreover, going within is also the best way to know what solutions you actually need: some people may need to reduce their physical activity, while others may need the exact opposite!

Build Up Your Courage and Motivation

Change is hard work. Whoever says otherwise is probably lying. Human beings are naturally resistant to any sort of change; we like to keep things controlled and smooth. To overcome some of the fibromyalgia symptoms, you will need to face things you may not want to face or that you may feel you are not prepared for. However, if you don’t face your shadow, your blockages, your fears, you can’t fully heal. In order to move forward in life and have space to flow, we must release what no longer serves us. It takes courage and motivation. It takes dedication. Please bare this in mind.

Pay Attention to What You Eat

I have a strong emotional relationship with food and my eyes have crossed at least a dozen of different diets – from souping to keto diet, you pick and choose. Each person needs to know and find what works best for them, but there is some basic assumptions that I believe to true and suitable for everyone: you got to eat your greens and you have to go as natural as possible. I strongly recommend that you eat more high vibrational foods such as vegetables, berries, and nuts. To learn more about this, please consider reading this and this blog post.

Relationship Quality

Relationships and how one deals with them seems to be often a common issue among fibromyalgia patients. This means that you may want to have a closer look on whether there are too much toxic relationships in your life or whether you struggle to be assertive (i.e. having to say NO when you actually mean NO) with certain people. Due to the natural complexity of human relationships, these are also frequently a source of stress, so if you can manage them better, the less energy you will have to spend worrying  and ruminating about them.

Self-Empowerment

Last but not least, you may need to also look and work your self-esteem, your self-confidence, and self-worth. Sometimes we think so poorly of ourselves that we get drained by our own negative thoughts and limiting beliefs. Working on aspects such as your shadow self and overall happiness will help you with having more stamina, energy, and motivation in life. Please remember that all is energy – if it is not flowing, it is because something is blocking it and this may well be your self-perception.

And this it my well-being folks, this is all I have learned so far through my own experience, research, and countless mind-body medicine study hours. I hope some of these inputs can be useful to you. If you want more detailed information and tips, please make sure you watch my YouTube video on this, because I shared a few more details in there that might help you too. In there you will also find a FREE exercise to help you manage the symptoms.

Do let me know too about your own experience with fibro, chronic fatigue, or any other similar syndrome as I’m sure we can learn more about it together and eventually help who needs this kind of information.

Much love and healing on your way.

PS: You can also connect with me daily through my Instagram account here, and if you are a Portuguese speaker, you may also want to visit my Portuguese page on Facebook here.

 

7 Traits of a Highly Sensitive Person

In this blog post I will share with you 7 common traits among highly sensitive people.

Today I came home earlier to run away (again) from dealing with an energy that I can only tolerate for a short while at the moment. This energy is a mix of anger, frustration, and an achy sense that I’m still the odd one out at the age of 29.

I reached out a friend when I arrived home and asked her “Why can’t we be like everyone else?”. There are these moments in which the blessing of sensitivity transforms itself into a really ugly and bad curse. Then all I know is that being a highly sensitive person (HSP) is too hard, too much, and too painful.

Being highly sensitive, we know what people feel, think, and intend without even knowing them. We can feel what others are going through, even if they are standing on the other side of the road and separated from us by a high fence. This happened to me last Saturday: I went to my office so I could record some YouTube videos. As usual, the building was empty. I suddenly started to feel very anxious for no reason. I realised then that the campus was getting crowded, full of students and families. Freshers were settling in and I could sense the anxiety and fear of students and their families. That’s why I was feeling overly anxious too.

The feeling got so intense that I could not record or do any work here on my blog. I packed my stuff, took a foot path to come back home, and spent a few hours working on my energy field until I felt like I was back to “normal”. This is why sometimes the blessing instantly becomes a curse. As you may guess this way of functioning can be very debilitating sometimes. We become overwhelmed and distressed not necessarily because something happens to us, but because it is our very own nature to be in tune with what and who is around us.

 

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I believe HSPs come to this “overwhelming stage” every once in a while because no one taught us how to manage our energy field. I still don’t know how to handle it sometimes and when that happens I think we feel really isolated, because the majority of people do not understand the way we perceive and sense reality, and therefore can not provide us with the right support.

For all this, I thought it would be helpful for me and others to write a little bit more about the traits of HSPs and explain them the best I can. If our differences make us feel weird, we might as well use them to empower us, so here are what I believe to be the seven most important traits of highly sensitive people.

1. We Are Aware of the Invisible

My favourite book, “The Little Prince”, has a passage which says “what is essential is invisible to the eye” and HSPs feel this to be very true. We can tell whenever there is something going wrong with someone because somehow we assimilate, even though unconsciously, certain signs and details that give us a lot of information about others.

2. We Can Read People

We can indeed read people because of what I explained in the previous point – the fact that we are aware of subtle forms of expression allows us to know what other people feel and even think. I believe this has simply to do with our awareness and I also think that anyone can become highly sensitive as long as there is some kind of training of one’s own level of awareness. That’s why people who start meditating or doing yoga often find themselves more sensitive and aware after some practise.

3. We Are Affected by Other People’s Mood

The fact that we have access to subtler forms of information makes us very sensitive to other people’s states and moods. More often than not we do not control this and I believe that the more we, as a society, learn and accept the way HSPs function, the more we can advance in terms of understanding and finding effective ways to use this ability on demand.

4. We Spend a Lot of Time in Our Heads

Most of us are born-observers and we use or learn to use telepathy a lot. There is a giant, complex and unique world inside each HSPs’ head and that’s why we get lost so often. If there is too much stimulation, we also struggle to stop our thoughts and “hypothesis” test in our minds. This is when we need to get out of our mind and get into our body.

5. Loud Noises, Strong Smells and Tastes are a Big No

I was never able to deal with perfumes, something that most women adore. I also always run away from drugstores and any supermarket’s detergent section. Abrupt noises also annoy me a lot and make my ears and head hurt. I think I’m not so affected by strong tastes, but that’s probably because I use food all the time. I’m very sensitive nonetheless to spices and I can have a hard time with even “mild” flavours.

6. The Experience of Being Hungry and Uncomfortable is Magnified

This is so true… the only time that either being hungry or uncomfortable do not bother me much is when I’m doing something I love such as writing this blog post. Right now, I’m hungry, but my wish to write is bigger than the discomfort of starvation. In most cases, however, whenever I’m hungry or uncomfortable I don’t seem to be able to tolerate it. If the problem is being hungry, I easily become “angry”. If the problem is being uncomfortable, the experience in itself becomes very painful and more often than not bruises or aches do follow it.

7. We Feel a Deep Urge For Being Creative

Our thoughts and feelings run so wildly that using creativity is often our favourite way to manage or balance our energy. From creative writing to painting, dancing, or any other form of creative expression, we do enjoy the feeling of expansion that such activities provide us. It is also a way for us to get “out” of our head and be more in our body.

 

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