5 Offline Activities You Must Add To Your Well-being Routine

Spending time offline is very important to our mental health and wellbeing. Sometimes it seems rather difficult, however, to disconnect from our devices and social media channels. We became used to the idea that reaching to our mobile phones to use the internet or check our emails every two minutes are acceptable modern habits, behaviors we can’t live without. These behaviors can be, nonetheless, signs of phone addiction and inability, for instance, to practice non-doing.

A 2015 study by Silentnight concluded that people nowadays spend more time on their mobile phones and laptops than sleeping. This means people are not only more exposed to several electromagnetic frequencies, which can negatively impact our health and wellbeing in the long run, but they are also depriving themselves of important healthy habits such as sleeping enough, having quality time with others or keeping an active lifestyle.

To counteract this mindless tendency, in this post I’m suggesting 5 different activities that will not only contribute to your well-being but also help you stay offline more often.

1. Journaling

Get yourself a little notebook and take some time off to sit down somewhere nice and quiet to write down your thoughts and feelings. Writing is an incredible way to practice self-reflection and develop self-awareness. When we write, we may even explore aspects of our existence that we were not aware of, but which can bring us new insights and helpful information to improve our daily decision-making processes.

2. Walking

Going for a walk is one of my favorite ways of connecting with myself. It is also a great relaxation method. Whenever my mind is busy with some sort of problem, I go out for a walk and I always come back with a clearer perspective of what was bothering me in the first place. You don’t need to do long distances through – a ten to fifteen-minute power walk can bring you a lot of health and wellbeing benefits.

3. Meal Sharing

In Southern European countries (and most Latin countries), meals are often a social moment. It’s an opportunity to gather people around a table and enjoy each other’s company. You don’t need to be sharing a meal with a big group though. You can invite your best friend or partner for a cute picnic or a homemade meal. You can even order your food if you want to. Just make sure you won’t be spending time on Instagram uploading pictures of what you are eating!

4. Reading

Ok, I know you may not be a book lover – or maybe you are -, but one of my favorite ways to disconnect is to spend some time studying a book. I’m a non-fiction kind of booklover, so I love devouring a book and then taking several notes on what I find interesting. Some of those notes become blog posts later on, so this is definitely a great option to spend more time offline and yet still be a productive blogger!

5. Forest Bathing

I told you about walking already, right? Forests are one of my favorite places to walk in because it’s free from all those weird vibrations and electromagnetic frequencies that harm our energy. I always feel replenished after spending some time in a forest or some other place where nature conquers everything!

Concluding Thoughts

It’s good for our health and well-being to spend some time away from the digital world. There are a lot of different activities you can engage with when you are offline. Sometimes we don’t recall how restoring these activities can be so I hope this list can remind and inspire you to go offline and look after yourself. If you enjoyed reading this article, you may find other ideas to improve your quality of life here.

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The Powerful Healing Effects of Color

I guess it all started when ‘color therapy’ started to come to my head almost every day. Then I also started to follow someone on YouTube whose work is partly related to the use of colors as a healing method. Next, I bumped into someone in my department who was wearing a beautiful and colorful headband. It was yellow, orange, pink, and a little bit of blue and green here, and there. It definitely caught my eye and, more importantly, it made me smile! While I was telling my colleague how beautiful her headband was, my mind also whirled around with thoughts.

Color can have a positive influence on our and other people’s moods. This knowledge has been used in Marketing to elicit a specific action from you.

Isn’t that interesting, the power of colors? I should explore that more. It’s such a beautiful way to positively influence other people’s moods. That’s when I started doing more serious research into it. There are many books and articles on the psychology of colors. This knowledge has been used in Marketing to elicit a specific action from you and each color has specific properties.

Here is some information I discovered about primary colors: yellow, red, and blue. Yellow helps with memory, encourages communication, boosts confidence, and stimulates the nervous system. It is associated with happiness, energy, and optimism. Red elevates blood pressure, stimulates libido, boosts metabolism, and increases your level of enthusiasm, energy, and confidence. Blue helps you relax and deal with stressful situations, boosts open-heart communication, and enhances your intelligence and intuition.

I then moved on to studying other colors and different tones and shades of color, until I decided to apply this knowledge to myself. Based on my research I realized I had been unconsciously picking clothes whose colors clearly mirrored and reinforced my low mood. For instance, some of the colors I was wearing every day included black, dark grey, and dark olive green, which are associated with less positive feelings and sensations such as depression and fogginess. Empowered by this information, I thought I should find a way to reverse it by changing the colors I was choosing to put on myself.

Buying new clothes at this point in time, however, was out of the question. Instead, I decided to recycle some t-shirts, transform them into fashionable scarfs, and color them based on what I had studied about colors and their therapeutic effect. I first created a scarf in blue tones, because I needed to relax and reduce my anxiety levels. Then I decided to create another scarf to induce some calmness allied with some playfulness as well. It’s fun to make experiences with color!

Concluding Thoughts

Using color as a healing method might not be the first option we think of but it’s a powerful one. Since I began this journey of learning more about color and its impact on psychology, I’ve been using and mixing different colors when selecting pieces of clothing and accessories. Today, even my eyeglasses frames are picked with the impact of color in mind. I may not see them but I know people always find my eyeglasses fun.

Become a Well-being Ambassador

The role of a Well-being Ambassador is to influence one’s own well-being and raise awareness of the importance of an overall culture of well-being that gives people permission to be and care for themselves.

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Codependent Families & Family Roles: What’s Yours?

Codependent families are dysfunctional families, and there is no way I can sugarcoat this. Believe me, I tried to in the past because no one really enjoys waking up one day and realizing that their most secret suspicion – something is not right about their family – is a reality. Please know that there are no perfect families, as there are no perfect individuals, but there are definitely families that are less psychologically healthy than others, and that can cause a great deal of trauma and negative consequences for a person’s development and growth.

My family has codependency issues and this is a problem that goes from at least three generations back. And just because you can identify this problem in your own family it doesn’t mean you haven’t been affected or even display codependent tendencies on a regular basis. Once you’re born into it, it takes continued effort to heal unhealthy behavioral and relational patterns. It takes inner work and maturity to learn and accept that such tendencies have shaped who you are and how you see the world. Let’s dive deeper into the concept of codependency first though.

According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, codependency is a psychological condition or a relationship in which a person is controlled or manipulated by another who is affected with a pathological condition. This pathological condition can go from addiction (e.g. drugs) to personality disorders (e.g. borderline personality disorder) and personality traits (e.g. authoritarianism). When codependency is part of a family’s psychology, there are power struggles between its members and a good amount of control and manipulation.

In codependent families, it’s not unusual to find that each member assumes a certain role within the family dynamic. The role can change from time to time, depending on the family’s dynamic as a whole. Sometimes one family member may have more than one role. According to Wegscheider-Cruse, there are 5 different roles: the enabler, the hero, the lost child, the scapegoat, and the mascot. Although unhealthy, these roles have a survival value and they allow family members to experience less pain and stress on a daily basis. Within my family, for instance, I have played different roles to reduce the cognitive dissonance that results from living and growing up within a codependent family.

Unless some sort of therapy is initiated, people have usually no idea they are living and breathing from such roles. They may experience and sense that there is something wrong with the family dynamic, but might not be able to point out exactly what. People may even prefer to live in the delusion that everything is alright just to keep the status quo and what’s familiar. The cost of keeping these roles active is, nonetheless, very high since they are psychologically unhealthy and, if not healed, can be passed to the following generation.

The Enabler

The Enabler is usually the member who is emotionally closer to the person who struggles with addiction or personality imbalances. There is a clear relationship of dependence between the enabler and that person. As situations become more chaotic and less controllable over time, the enabler tends to compensate the addict/unhealthy person by trying to control and manipulate reality, because the enabler feels extremely responsible for the family and therefore must keep it together at all costs. Enablers are usually the members of a family who extend themselves beyond measure to fulfill different chores, responsibilities, and both the physical and emotional needs of the whole family. People who play this role are very keen on hiding their fear, hurt, anger, guilt, and pain by displaying self-blame, manipulation, and self-pity.

The Hero

The Hero is usually the oldest child and the person who knows more about what is going on with the family. They know the family has issues and therefore they try to improve or make things better by becoming super achievers, providers, or surrogate spouses (when children are used to fulfilling a parent’s emotional needs). The Hero tends to look older than he/she is because they learned they had to act responsibly from a very young age in order to survive. Heroes are often keen on hiding their loneliness, hurt, confusion, unworthiness, and anger by making their best to be special, competent, and confident. They often develop an independent second life away from the family.

The Scapegoat

The Scapegoat is usually identified in the family as the problem child since they are keen on finding themselves in trouble both at home and in school. This is the family member in which the other family members place their anger and frustration. By focusing its attention on the problematic child, the family keeps the illusion that everything else is alright and healthy. Their role is to create a distraction from the root problem. Unlike the Hero, the Scapegoat seeks validation not within the family but in his peer group. Scapegoats are very keen on hiding their pain and rejection feelings by withdrawing from the family, engaging in risky behaviors, acting out, and displaying aggressive behaviors.

The Lost Child

The Lost Child tends to manifest withdrawing behaviors but instead of withdrawing to a peer group, they withdraw into themselves. They may protect themselves by retreating to their fantasy world. They often don’t act out, like the Scapegoat does, and they don’t seek achievements as the Hero. As such, they may go invisible and don’t get much attention from the family. The Lost Child’s role is to provide relief to the family by not giving others the chance to worry about them. Lost Children are very keen on hiding their loneliness, pain, and sense of inadequacy by being quiet, distant, and super independent.

The Mascot

The Mascot is usually charming and pleasant. They often make others laugh and their role is to provide light entertainment. The Mascot is often the family member who knows the least about the family’s root problem and they are rarely taken seriously. Underneath their distraction attempts lies a great amount of fragility. Mascots are keen on hiding their fear, insecurity, and loneliness by being hyperactive, cute, and doing funny things to grab people’s attention.

What now?

If some of these roles rang a bell, the first thing I recommend you to do is to discuss this with a close friend or book a session with a professional who can help you process this information. I know it’s a very sensitive and sometimes overwhelming topic. I have personally dealt with generational codependency and I know what it’s like. Healing can bring hurt in the first stages but it’s the only way to gain psychological freedom and break the cycle. If you would like to book a session with me, you can do it here.

Is Happiness a Realistic Goal?

realistic goal and a desirable one. It is rather impossible to be happy all the time, of course, and it is rather difficult to be in a pure state of bliss on a regular basis. However, we can aim to develop skills and strategies that enhance our level of consciousness.

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The 4 Jewels of Well-being

According to neuroscientist Richard Davidson, well-being is a skill, and it can be developed with practice. It’s like learning to walk or playing the piano. The more you practice it, the more you strengthen the neuronal circuits associated with well-being, and the better you get at it. These neuronal circuits are plastic and thus can be expanded and trained. They are awareness, connection, insight, and purpose.

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